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Dangerous exercises
#21
It's some sort of heresy, but squats with a heavy weight put somewhere on top of the spine is a stupid exercise, especially if one's goal is to train legs. Barbell back squats fall into this category, but also front squats, goblet squats, etc., they just mitigate problems with "foldability" by shifting a center of mass closer to the middle of your feet. Anyhow we look at it, the force has to go through your spine and no amount of bracing nor other drills can change it. Muscles stabilize the spine, yeah, but don't take away tension from the spine.

Upright rows are not smart, since you can train the same muscles without actually impinging your shoulders. My first gym injury was due to upright rows, couldn't rise my arm beneath shoulder level for a week, lol.
Flys don't bring anything new to the table if you do BB or DB press, just put your shoulders in vulnerable position at the bottom of the motion and strain your pecs.
Pushes and pulls overhead behind a neck are pointless too and virtually have no advantage compared to similar exercises done in front. That said, people with long clavicles still gonna have problems with exercises like military presses.

It may seem paranoid, but if a longevity is the goal rather than performance and huge numbers, then it's better to avoid above mentioned exercises and do safer alternatives. How many elder lifters do you see performing back squats and deadlifts on regular basis? What happens to people who were proficient at these lifts in their heydays that they stop doing them altogether?

PS: My first post here, so hi all Wink
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#22
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iC5hTzJ7frw

Globrain wrote

"pull-overs only work to expand the rib cage until you reach your early twenties"

"Behind the neck presses are unsafe, destroy your rotator cuff"

"Barbell extensions of any kind, standing or otherwise, wreck your elbows"

"There are many other Golden Age exercises that should be abandoned, such as behind-the-neck pulldowns, upright rows, etc. "
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#23
^ We may need to agree to disagree.

(From the YouTube comments:

"McTastyy

behind the neck shoulder press is one of the worst exercises you can do. Ive seen countless guys have shoulder problems due to adding it to their routine. It puts your rotator cuff in an unnatural position, and with all that weight and stress on top of it, you're bound to get injured")
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#24
(03-23-2019, 02:11 AM)Simple Simon Wrote: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iC5hTzJ7frw

Globrain wrote

"Barbell extensions of any kind, standing or otherwise, wreck your elbows"

Triceps extensions are fine if you do them correctly. Cf. Rippetoe/Blaha style for a form that doesn't wreck your elbow tendons. Additionally, if you *slightly* flare your elbows during the downwards movement when passing though the 90 degrees position it becomes even less stressful. You can also do your wrists a favor and use an sz-bar if you like.

I have done the exact same exercise for *years* (almost every week) with almost 50kg (regular 20kg barbell plus 25-30kg extra weight) without any problems whatsoever.

I do get tendonitis though if I do it bodybuilding-style (lower the bar to the forehead). It's even stupid in terms of triceps development to do the exercise that way. So I have no idea why the muscle maniacs are doing this.
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#25
Behind the neck pullups and wide grip pullups - pointless and dangerous to your joints
But it looks cool in movies
Dips beyond parallel line also - pointless and dangerous to your joints
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#26
Chest Flyes - Immense pressure in the shoulder joint and absolutely pointless to perform. Just no. The rest of the movements below may serve some purposes to you and the reward may out do the risk but this will never apply to flyes.. gtfoh with that.

Heavy Squats/Deads - Heavy being anything that pushes close to x2 bodyweight. Its great if you have require that level strength but its just not worth it. So much damn pressure on the spine, joints and tendons. Also the tiniest mess up in form can easily result in a tear on snap.

Heavy Push Press - Mess up an explosive lock out with above your strict OHP max and its snap city with a heavy barbell also crashing down.

Heavy Behind the neck movements with a bar - Asking for a neck strain or shoulder injury at some point. If you want that angle use dumbbells.

Heavy tricep isolation - tendonitis or a trapped nerve will occur at some point.

Upright rows - They're not for everyone and narrow grip upright rows are for no one.

Weighted Sissy Squats - So much unnecessary pressure on the knees.

Got to disagree with dips being dangerous. It is really dependent on your flexibility. I've been doing deep dips for a decade and weighted (maxed at 80kg). I've never had an issue ever. Its a staple movement for me personally and I also had clients perform them once they had the flexibility. Its never resulted in injury. Its a great movement for upper body development and the strength passes over to just about all pushing movements.
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#27
^ Re. flyes, I have never heard they are dangerous in all my years. Wow! But yes the shouldn't be performed as the are "absolutely pointless".

Re. dips, to me, it's the behind the back bench dips that are being referred to as dangerous to the shoulders - though I have to admit, I never had any issues when performing them. I think they do encourage bouncing (poor form).
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#28
(03-27-2019, 12:10 AM)Peak Wrote: Weighted Sissy Squats - So much unnecessary pressure on the knees.
They are so ridiculous I refuse to call them an exercise Big Grin
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#29
(03-27-2019, 03:36 AM)Simple Simon Wrote: ^ Re. flyes, I have never heard they are dangerous in all my years. Wow! But yes the shouldn't be performed as the are "absolutely pointless".

 Re. dips, to me, it's the behind the back bench dips that are being referred to as dangerous to the shoulders - though I have to admit, I never had any issues when performing them. I think they do encourage bouncing (poor form).

Re: You have now, you're welcome for that bro. 
Possibly just saved your shoulder joints and tendons.
A far better alternative would be a plate push.

Re: Yeah perhaps as you're basically putting you arm in the hammerlock position for reps.
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#30
https://www.quora.com/What-workouts-or-e...t-workouts
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