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This Body is the Result of Push-ups Only
#11
(05-21-2019, 05:38 AM)Simple Simon Wrote: ^
Just so I get it right, is that 2000 in total, or for each type?

2000 for each type if you want similiar results.

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#12
Don't miss workouts. Else, the magic won't work.
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#13
^^ Thanks, but wow! I'm going to have to employ the Weider Triple Split Principle for that. I'll do 2,000 of one type in a morning workout, 2,000 of another at lunch, and 2,000 of another in the evening.

^ If you miss a workout, you can be sure one of your competitors down the line didn't.
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#14
(05-20-2019, 01:33 PM)Grinch Wrote: Do over 2000 situps every day, and over 2000 push ups of different varieties everyday, for over 30 years, and you too might look like Herschel Walker. Or not. Try it out and let us know.

Can i do 20 000 of each every day for 3 years?
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#15
^ I can answer that.

Assuming they take one second each: 20,000s /(60x60) = 5.55 hours

So do to 20k each would take 11hrs a day every day for the next 3 years.
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#16
(05-22-2019, 03:38 AM)Simple Simon Wrote: ^ I can answer that.

Assuming they take one second each: 20,000s /(60x60) = 5.55 hours

So do to 20k each would take 11hrs a day every day for the next 3 years.

How bad do you want it?

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#17
^^ "Serge [Nubre] didn't believe in special dieting. He said he'd just train harder, sometimes up to five hours a day, six days a week. This also allowed him to stay near his competition weight year round"

"How was it possible?

Was it simply due to pharmaceutical help? Not likely – Serge said he'd never even heard of performance enhancing drugs until he'd already built his winning physique. (He started training in 1958 and lived on a small island.)"
(https://www.t-nation.com/training/serge-...p-training)
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#18
(05-24-2019, 04:00 PM)Simple Simon Wrote: ^^ "Serge [Nubre] didn't believe in special dieting. He said he'd just train harder, sometimes up to five hours a day, six days a week. This also allowed him to stay near his competition weight year round"

"How was it possible?

Was it simply due to pharmaceutical help? Not likely – Serge said he'd never even heard of performance enhancing drugs until he'd already built his winning physique. (He started training in 1958 and lived on a small island.)"
(https://www.t-nation.com/training/serge-...p-training)

The pictures of when he was young are definitely not his winning physique.

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#19
^^ Back on topic.

"Serge trained his abs once a day, every day. Immediately after waking, he would perform 2000 – yes Dr. McGill, twothousand – sit-ups. The sheer volume of the sit-ups is also the only form of "cardio" he ever performed."
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#20
https://sealgrinderpt.com/blog/navy-seal...kout.html/
By Jordan 17 Comments
"The Herschel Walker workout routine will blow your mind. It’s so simple that I didn’t believe it could work at first.
Surely Herschel must bench press 500 pounds to build a chest like that, right?Nope. He doesn’t lift weights. You read that correctly. This monster of a man doesn’t lift any weights. Herschel Walker’s workout routine consists of solely bodyweight exercises.

"In fact, he’s trained using the same bodyweight exercises for decades. These bodyweight workouts are Herschel’s ‘secret’ to achieving peak physical development and performance.

In this post I’ll also share Herschel Walker’s insane bodyweight workout routine so you can try it on for size. You’ll see first-hand the sheer amount of volume and exercise variations Herschel performed is enough to make your head spin.

"Herschel had an interest in athletics but couldn’t afford weights. So instead he used bodyweight exercises to get stronger. As a young teenager, he started doing push-ups, pull-ups, bodyweight squats, sit-ups and sprints every day.
Eventually working his way up to over 3500 push-ups and 1500 sit-ups a day. Herschel Walker performed this workout every. single. day. For years."

"Recently in a video interview on Fight Magazine on June 26, 2010 he stated that he still performs 3,500 sit-ups and 1,500 push ups every day. He would do this workout before he would walk into practice for the Georgia Bulldogs at a college level.

"As a young kid at 15 he did even more with 5,000 sit-ups and 1,500 pushups. Special Forces athletes know this as they are required by their training to do massive amounts of bodyweight exercises on a daily routine.

"Herschel Walker's Basic Training Paperback – August 25, 1989"
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/038526...57de5be6d7
Reviewers said he did a lot of pullups.

https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/...r-workout/
"While push-ups, chin-ups, sit-ups, and sprints formed the core of Walker’s workout, they were hardly the only exercises he did. Herschel did different bodyweight exercises like squats and dips, loaded hay and performed other chores around the farm, "
"And all along, up until the present day, he’s kept up with the bodyweight workout he first starting doing in junior high. In fact, he didn’t start lifting weights until several years into his professional football career. It’s not that he had anything against it, but he had seen improvements in his strength and speed every year since high school, and figured he’d only start lifting once those gains ceased. After his football days were over, he returned to a bodyweight-only program, as he believes it protects the joints and promotes fitness longevity."
“I was always trying to find some new way to sprint or some new way to do push-ups or sit-ups to keep my interest up and to make my body work in different ways so it would get strong from every angle.”
"At first Walker stuck with doing the standard, hands shoulder-width apart push-up, but in high school he started incorporating different variations, including doing them with his feet elevated on a chair, with hands together under the chest, one-handed push-ups, and handstand push-ups. He would mix these harder variations in with the standard kind, trying to increase the ratio of harder to easier ones, all the while increasing his overall number of reps.
"Pull-ups/Chin-ups. As a young man, Walker did 1,500 pull-ups a day, alternating between palms facing away, palms facing towards, and pulling up until the bar touched behind his head. When those became too easy, he’d tie a weight plate around his waist, and also do one-armed pull-ups, where one hand holds the bar, and the other grasps the wrist of the hand doing the holding.
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